Learning New Keys: How Washington D.C. Developer, Natassja Linzau, Is Transforming Data Literacy in Government

Natassja Linzau ● National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine ● Web Developer

Natassja Linzau ● National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine ● Web Developer

Like engineers, piano teachers are guided by best practices. Piano teachers typically advise their students to think carefully about the composition and the structure, work through trial and error, and think about what outputs they want to achieve.

In high school, Natassja knew she wanted to pursue a career in music. She studied music and psychology at the Brigham Young University and later received her in Masters in Music at Catholic University. While running her music teaching studio, Natassja would guide and mentor her students on the best practices of the piano.

In the mid-90s, she began working at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington D.C. as a secretary. Still passionate about music, during her spare time, she volunteered at the D.C. Federation of Music Clubs. The organization needed a website and she offered to help, as she had taken a programming class in high school. She enjoyed building their website and knew from there she could do more. She wanted to understand web development and front-end engineering better, so she took online classes at night through the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne. During this time, she was also taking care of three kids and balancing three jobs but was able to pursue a new career path she never considered before. Over the next 18 years, Natassja transitioned from her administrative role to an official Web Graphics Designer to Web Developer.

From piano keys to a computer keyboard, Natassja took her career to the next level. Natassja joined Women Who Code DC in 2015 and met other women passionate about technology who wanted to enter the industry. However, in the beginning she noticed a lack of female mentors. So, she started the Mentoring Program within their chapter, which helped connect women with role models in the tech industry.

In 2016, she took a position with the U.S. Department of Commerce as a lead front-end engineer. In this role, she oversaw the Discovery team of the Commerce Data Service, however, after a couple short months, she found another opportunity to help lead the Data Education Initiative. This new project, also called the Commerce Data Academy, created opportunities for the U.S. Department of Commerce employees to learn more about data science, cybersecurity, and new programming languages. Natassja lead this project because she wanted to foster mentorship within America’s Data Agency. More than 1000 employees signed up for the initial classes. The program she designed contained over 38 technical courses, and was so popular it began attracting interest from other federal agencies.

Moving beyond the Census Data Academy, Natassja was the Lead of the Data Talent Working Group for the U.S. Data Cabinet, which was responsible for developing guidelines and standards for data training, education, and professional development for many data roles in the federal government. This was especially important so that federal agencies can find the right data scientists for the right jobs. She also helped standardize the terminology for data on USAJobs.gov, while developing the Data Science Jobs microsite.

Over the past couple of years, Natassja has created new opportunities for female technologists, her co-workers and future data scientists interested in joining the Federal workforce. Her musician mindset of persistence and discipline allowed her to keep going, despite not starting out on a traditional path to tech.

“Be patient, and persist. Keep going and learning. Like in coding, there’s always something new to learn. Things are always changing.”