Latin America

Paving the Way for a more Sustainable Future: How Tatiana Estévez Carlucci is developing technology to harvest water from fog

Tatiana Estévez Carlucci ● Founder and CEO ● Permalution

Tatiana Estévez Carlucci ● Founder and CEO ● Permalution

“I have always wanted to make a difference by improving the world as much as I can.”

Even at a young age, Tatiana had a knack for improving the way machines worked. She often disarmed things that didn’t work in her childhood house, such as the washing machine. Her love for  improving processes developed into a passion to make the world a more sustainable place to live. Originally entering college as a business student, Tatiana opted to take several engineering classes and formed a deep connection with environmental engineering and water-related technologies. This connection led her to found, Permalution, a company that focuses on fog water harvesting and holistic project development.

“I believe that some of the big issues that we face worldwide are companies that are not sustainable. If we put our money into businesses that are environmentally cultured, I think we can have a cleaner long-lasting environment,” Tatiana says.

With this vision for the future, in 2015, Tatiana founded her startup while she was living in San Francisco. However, it was only after she moved to Mexico that the company really started to grow. She wanted to focus on harvesting water from fog using similar methods to traditional rainwater harvesting. Utilizing fog as a source for water could have several applications including, harvesting steam to recycle water in the textile industry, developing self-producing energy systems, and helping improve farming and agriculture.

There are five main types of fog, and although Tatiana wants to eventually harvest them all, she and her team are currently focused on harvesting coastal fog which mostly is formed close to water. Tatiana’s first task was to start looking for different designs and materials that would improve upon older methods. Although she had background knowledge from taking mechanical, electrical, and environmental engineering classes in college, it still took an extensive amount of research to ultimately design her first project.

“I built the first functional prototype to show my roommate we could harvest the fog that passed through our window, and in the morning, the whole floor was wet and damp, “ Tatiana proudly shares.

After improving the design, it was featured as a finalist in Singularity University’s Global Impact Challenge. It was also featured in Fast Company as one of the 3 new devices that could “suck water from thin air.”  With that recognition, Tatiana realized that Permalution had the potential to be implemented globally. She began building a team that included two thermal engineers to help further develop her prototype.

They continued to develop their design through a partnership with a research center at a university in China that was developing a synthetic silk from a spider that had the properties of water capture. Tatiana and her team built upon that experience to design more scalable, yield-improving materials.

Permalution first identifies a place that seems optimal to harvest fog. Secondly, the team sets a sensor module that runs for 4 to 8 weeks that allows them to determine where to place the fog catcher. The fog can then make contact with the membrane and start draining the water that usually falls in the gutter.

“We can harvest up to 3 times more water with fog than rain in areas where fog conditions are optimal. We are now exploring [how] to add solar energy and rain harvesting to the modules. We can use the membrane we created to use cloud seeding technologies to create fog anywhere in the world.”

Tatiana and her team are in the process of building a 20 meter replica of the prototype in Mexico for a massive reforestation project in Tepic, Nayarit. She explains that the water industry is highly regulated, so in the process of creating a new product, she must also navigate governmental laws and public policy related to water which can sometimes be a hindrance.

“I try to focus on the opportunities of the future instead of the current limitations. The encouragement I received from other fellow women at the CleanTech accelerator program and through competitions was gold to me. I learned a lot from women who became my role models, so I try as much as I can to assist, motivate, and encourage women who have their own initiatives.”

For this reason, in addition to the work Tatiana is doing with Permalution, she also founded Tech Quiero, an organization that supports women and girls with learning how to code.

“A misconception I often have to dispel, mainly for women who have the spark to be engineers, is that it is not about working with engines, as many believe. The word engineer comes from ingeniare which means to use your genius to put things together and make something new, useful, innovative. This is the basis for creating a new world.”

Tatiana hopes that other women can find their calling in life and believe in themselves enough to help further the creation of this constantly changing, new world we live in.

Transforming Latin American Talent: How Laboratoria Alumna, Shazil Tovar, Is Closing the Technology Gender Gap

Shazil Tovar ● Front-End Developer ● Accenture

Shazil Tovar ● Front-End Developer ● Accenture

In Mexico, the technology scene is booming, with engineering and development jobs on the rise.  However, female representation in the Latin America tech scene still has some progress to make. Four years ago, Laboratoria wanted to fix that, by recruiting Latina women to help bridge the divide.

Shazil Tovar of Mexico City was one of the applicants accepted into Laboratoria’s 4th cohort. From Ciudad de Mexico (CDMX) to San Paulo, Brazil, Shazil rose to the top of a competitive applicant pool across Latin America. As a student, Shazil always thought about being a developer, however, it was not clear how she could pursue that dream.  Despite studying Systems Engineering and creating web pages for fun, she never thought she could use her coding skills for a career. Even in Latin America, getting a formal education or technical training is not enough, as most Latina Women have less than a 20% chance to transition to a formal job. After getting married and starting a family, her aspirations of having a career in tech began to fade.

Then...something happened. She discovered a new path.

Now she’s a Software Developer for Accenture in Mexico City, and has been for the last year and a half. When she first started in early 2017, she was the Angular team, working primarily on frameworks. She was able to transition to the Testing team, where she’s currently testing automation for Android devices, in addition to developing robots for services performance tests. Beyond developing strong technical skills, the mentorship and support from the Laboratoria community help her balance her new career and her family.

During Laboratoria’s six-month bootcamp, Shazil was able to learn alongside her peers that shared her dreams of a better career opportunity.  Over a 1000 hours were committed to coding, where they learned about responsive apps, Bootstrap frameworks, and JQuery elements.

“They literally sculpted a new woman, the best version of me. Every key from the keyboard I pushed within these walls, was worthy. I didn’t realize entirely what I was doing, not until I saw it presented within a real software product solution for a very important bank in the world, then I realized what I was capable of doing and I had a mixture of emotions and gratitude that pushed away most of my fears and insecurities.”

As a Laboratoria Alum, Shazil is part of the stronghold of technically trained and equipped women who are recognized on a global scale, including allies from Google and Facebook.

“Laboratoria changed the way I see women in technology... I didn’t even realize that there were so few women working at this sector [and] women talent was needed… This [movement] is just starting. ”

With over 850 alumni as of April 2018, Laboratoria’s mission is to help fill the 450,000 available jobs with as many women as possible. The end-goal is empowering women, providing the technical and personal support they need, and allowing them to become change agents for the technology industry as a whole.