Learn to code

The Art of Code and the Code in Art: How Aimee Lucido Blends Code, Music and Writing to Tell Her Story

Aimee Lucido ● Senior Android Engineer ● Uber Eats

Aimee Lucido ● Senior Android Engineer ● Uber Eats

“I love working on hard problems that actually touch people, I love working with a team, and ultimately, I love shipping a product to millions — if not billions — of people. That feeling never gets old!”

Aimee Lucido loves being a working engineer. One of her most memorable projects at Uber was the development of a robust and stable UI to allow drivers to get a bonus by recruiting riders to sign up to become drivers themselves. The project spanned four different teams, three microsystems, and involved large changes to the API. As the sole engineer on a very large full-stack project, she had to learn new languages and navigate differing team priorities.

Aimee got interested in coding in middle school through games and continued her interest in high school. She went on to receive degrees in computer science and literary arts from Brown University, and a fine arts master’s degree from Hamline University in creative writing for children and young adults.

Her advice to anyone who thinks they might be interested in coding: Just give it a try! See how it might be related to other interests you already have. Learning anything new can be a challenge. She recommends breaking challenges down into steps.

“If I’m feeling overwhelmed by something (or, more often, too many somethings) it helps me to make a list. Checking things off that list gives me a feeling of completion, and also it ensures that I don’t forget anything. And so often a really hard challenge feels hard only because there are so many tasks to accomplish, but no one item on the todo list is particularly strenuous. So if I remember that a big task is made up of lots of little tasks, it instantly becomes more manageable.”

In an effort to inspire more girls to share her love for engineering, Aimee authored a new children’s book, Emmy in the Key of Code, that will be published in September 2019 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Versify.

“It’s about a twelve-year-old ex-musician named Emmy who accidentally ends up in a computer science class, and finds herself connecting with code the way she always wanted to connect with music. It’s told in a hybrid of verse and Java code, and my hope is that kids will read it for the story, not realizing that they’re secretly also learning computer science.”

Adding to her passion for engineering and writing, Aimee is a lot of other things: A marathon runner, a musician, a crossword puzzle creator. And that’s the message that Aimee Lucido embodies: Computer science can be the main focus of your life or it can be just one of the many things you do. And you can use code itself to do the other things. Aimee sees math, music, art, poetry, and code as, essentially, the same thing: A way of communicating; a recipe to convey something to the world.

“Once you know code, it bleeds into everything you do.” Besides her first novel being about the connection between music and code, Aimee uses coding to help her make crossword puzzles she has published in The New York Times, Crosswords With Friends, and smaller indie publications.

Aimee is a vocal advocate for diversity in computing. While she knows that underrepresented groups, including women, still face challenges in the field, she appreciates the opportunity to be involved in the charge for change. Part of her work at Uber is to help increase diversity through leading by example and sharing her own experiences.

Her advice for anyone struggling to find a place for themselves in the tech industry is to “keep yourself loosely defined” and “say yes to everything” to maximize opportunities and possibilities you can’t yet imagine.

“Change your definition of yourself often; it keeps things interesting. But make sure to say no to things that don’t move you towards your goals.”

Old Code, New Tricks: How Andrea Goulet is renovating code through her business Corgibytes

Andrea Goulet ● CEO ● Corgibytes

Andrea Goulet ● CEO ● Corgibytes

As the daughter of entrepreneurial parents, it was only fitting for Andrea Goulet to learn the ropes of owning her own business at an early age. By age 12, Andrea was running a business that supported her father’s clients — handling everything from logistics and orders to invoices. Her natural ability to understand business was further propelled in college as a marketing student at Virginia Commonwealth University. When an old high school friend approached her about a business proposition after reading her marketing blog, Andrea was surprised to hear what he had to say.

“He told me that the way I think about marketing is very technical. He noticed I used algorithms and patterns, and my thought process included many elements of programming. I was always interested in technology, and he believed I would be a good fit for leading his startup.”

Since 2009, Andrea has become a serial entrepreneur and the founder of several brands, including Corgibytes. What started as a simple side hustle became her ultimate niche and passion. At Corgibytes, Andrea and her team revitalize legacy code, which Andrea describes as “code without trust,” but is commonly thought of as “fixer upper” software that needs to be modernized.

“When people ask me what is the purpose of re-engineering old code, I use this analogy. If you want to remodel your kitchen, you don’t bulldoze the entire house. There is good business logic embedded in an existing system, and there is usually a way to update and modernize something by doing a little bit at a time.”

Andrea explained that for many companies, updating software instead of rewriting it is not only cheaper but more efficient, especially if the code supports many users. To reinvent old code, there are a series of processes Andrea uses. First, she starts with a report that her company calls a “Code Inspection.” Because Corgibytes operates in a digital space without a physical product to touch, this report helps business teams visualize and understand different things that make code very healthy. Her team of developers measure and report on these aspects, such as code complexity, duplication, test coverage, team communication, and more. From there, they are able to decide how fragile the code is and what needs to be repaired. Andrea’s marketing background means that these recommendations, which are usually difficult to decipher by people who don’t code all day, are in plain English. This makes it easy for executives to understand and act on. To effectively lead Corgibytes, Andrea had to first submerge herself into coding classes.

“In the beginning, learning how to code was really hard. It’s difficult to get out of your comfort zone and learn something new. I watched a TED Talk by Carol Dweck about developing a growth mindset, and it helped me see that I can grow and eventually I’m going to learn it.”

The most popular programming languages that Corgibytes supports are Ruby, Python, Java, and C#. With the help of Code.org, Code Combat, freeCodeCamp, and various other learning tools, Andrea has become proficient in coding and she built a team that can help clients with a variety of programming languages.

Andrea shares her expertise through Legacy Code Rocks, a podcast she started that uncovers new tricks that programmers can use on old code. After previously having a marketing background and discovering what it is like to enter the tech industry, Andrea prides herself on being able to create a dialogue between business people and programmers.

“It has been an amazing feeling to translate business, which is my native language, to people who speak code because I understand both very well. Now I am able to help two people who normally wouldn’t be able to communicate effectively work through a problem.”

Her advice to others hoping to develop their own businesses in the technical industry is that the initial idea does not have to be perfect. She believes that anyone can create and develop a business on the side and work to watch it steadily grow over time, just as Corgibytes did. With the added help of a growth mindset, anything is possible.

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This story was told in partnership with Women in Tech Summits (WITS), which hosts events across the United States to connect, inspire and build a community of women building the future of tech. Andrea Goulet is a past speaker and serves on the WITS advisory council. Register for an event near you at https://womenintechsummit.net.

The Teacher Who Taught Herself to Code: How creating tools for her classroom launched Anna Andresian’s career in tech

Anna Andresian ● Staff Software Engineer ● AltSchool

Anna Andresian ● Staff Software Engineer ● AltSchool

Teachers unlock the potential in us all to acquire new skills and develop our talents and interests over time. For 11 years, Anna Andresian did just that as a Latin teacher at various middle and high schools around the United States.

As a high school student, Anna loved studying science and had dreams of becoming a high school physics teacher. Spanish and Latin, her next favorite subjects in school, influenced her decision to change her major once she entered college. After graduating from Brown University with a BA in Classics, Anna took a teaching job at Rocky Hill School in Rhode Island. In 2004, she moved to London to receive her master’s in Classics at Oxford. From there her passion for teaching and learning deepened, and she taught at numerous schools around the US, including in New Jersey and Colorado.

 As her teaching career progressed, Anna realized that she wanted to make the material delivery more dynamic and interactive for her students. She began recording macros in Microsoft Word, which are saved sequences of commands or keystrokes that can be recalled. She used macros to color code certain texts and allow for better language association. This experience sparked a curiosity in technology and led her to inspect the generated code to figure out how to write different macros to solve more complicated problems.

“This enabled me to use Word as a presentation tool without ever writing on the whiteboard,” Anna says. “I [then] created self-correcting Excel spreadsheets that allowed students to type in a Latin noun or verb and then type in its forms, receiving feedback about which answers were right and wrong.”

In 2012, Anna discovered an opportunity to establish a base of coding knowledge with the convenience of learning at her own school. When two students started an after-school programming club to teach other students how to write their own games, Anna decided to join and became “totally addicted to coding.”

“I started building some online tools that my students could use to practice their Latin, and I found that these online tools really changed the range of what was possible in my classes,” Anna says. “The more I learned, the more I felt was possible.”

She enjoyed creating new tools to use in the classroom, such as homework assignments that give automatic feedback and interactive games that teach students how to practice vocabulary. At the end of the 2013 school year, Anna took a break from teaching and attended the Recurse Center in New York for three months to further her coding knowledge. Out of pure interest in technology, she did a lot of back-end work at the workshop. After completing that program, Anna took her first technical job working on education web apps at Amplify.

“I really loved that the whole point of the [Recurse Center] program was not to get hired, but to make us better programmers,” she says. “You pick what you want to work on and you spend your days working towards that!”

 After working at Amplify for a year and a half, Anna joined AltSchool, where she now works as a staff software engineer. At AltSchool, Anna continues to build her technical skills working on developing their personalized learning platform for K12 schools. Through her hard work and dedication, Anna seeks to harness the power of technology to revolutionize teaching methods for schools across the nation.